STUFF & NONSENSE #1191

 
-> The sweet indifference
 
-> Some call love
 
-> The high indifference
 
-> Some call fate
 
-> But we…

 
The sweet indifference
 

 
Some call love
 

 
The high indifference
 

Labour’s conference this week has a visible faultline running through it. People floating mysteriously between corporate fringe events, dressed in the sharp suits and shiny tights of the Blair-Brown era, are still there. But nobody really understands why.

My heart leapt on Saturday when the SWP handed me a leaflet saying it did not want to be part of Corbyn’s Labour. The feeling is mutual.

So unused to events of historic significance have we become that we wander around concussed when they happen. People who wish the event had not happened rush to the airwaves to denounce them.

But you cannot stop history. At some point, having been hijacked by the elite class, Labour was always either going to collapse – as it has done in Scotland – or revive. What we witnessed was both revival and survival. Labour’s polls – in the teeth of a hostile press and active sabotage from within – may be low. But they are the highest of any socialist party in Europe.

 
Some call fate
 

 
But we…
 

The bosses of several of America’s biggest banks and corporations have warned Theresa May they will pre-emptively shift operations into Europe unless she can provide early clarity on the future shape of EU-UK relations…

“The message was clear from at least some of those present: if Theresa May cannot provide some early clarity about where the negotiations will end up, the only way to avoid that uncertainty would be a move towards Europe – there will not be time to wait,” said the City source with knowledge of the meeting.

Before the June 23 vote to leave the EU, the heads of several major foreign banks including JPMorgan and UBS warned that “significant” numbers of jobs could be shipped to Europe when the impacts of Brexit became clear.

Estimates of possible City job losses from a “hard Brexit” have ranged widely from 40,000 to 80,000 over the next decade, with JPMorgan and Morgan Stanley saying they could shift over 1,000 employees. Citigroup, Goldman Sachs and Bank of America have also warned of jobs losses to the Continent.

 

– > Leonard Cohen | Nevermind

 

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